First, read the recipe for your choice up to 2-3 times before you start cooking. Collect all the shared ingredients in one place (which avoids shame and disruption to find out at the last minute that you have run out of flour, sugar, lemon etc.). Prepare all ingredients as in the material list, as you can see with a professional chef on the T.V program. They, before you start cooking. If the number in the recipe claims to feed four, you can clearly divide the two quantities for two, or keep half in the refrigerator to eat later.

Next, when cooking soup, the trick is to get as much as possible it feels out of the ingredients and into the water. Saute the ingredients before adding a previously heated liquid or, as an alternative, place all the ingredients in the pan with cold water and salt, and let them heat up together.

To saute means gently frying on relatively low heat so that it avoids high temperature fryers, which destroy nutrients and are generally bad for health. Prepare all ingredients and place it in a separate stack. Heat a little oil in a skillet, then add the material to a pot of a stack at a time starting with a material that takes a long time to cook and finish with the most runny.

When cooking pasta must be served “Al Dentte” (a little chewy). The pasta lost its taste and texture if it was cooked and so it was best served al Dentte. A little oil in the water used to boil pasta will help avoid it to remain together. Vegetables cooked by Al Dentte are a little fresh with taste and bright colors intact.

Meat usually needs to be browned and “sealed” at the beginning of the cooking process. Saute first, set aside to add a plate, to cook correctly later.